Recipes for Healthy Food and Beverages

Natural Health Supply

excerpt from The Cure For All Diseases
© 1995 by Hulda Regehr Clark, Ph.D. N.D.

“Read old recipe books for the fun and savings of making your own nutritious food. Change the recipes to avoid processed ingredients. Here are some I found:

Beverage Recipes

Anything made in your own juicer is fine. Experiment with new combinations to create different flavorful fruit and vegetable juices. Consider the luxury of preparing gourmet juices which satisfy your own individual palate instead of the mass-produced, polluted varieties sold at grocery stores. Remember to wash all fruit, including citrus before juicing. This removes the ever-present pesticides and common fruit mold.

Lemonade

1 cup fresh lemon juice, 1 cup honey, 1 1/2 quarts water. Bring honey and water to a boil if you plan to keep it several days. Then add lemon juice and store in refrigerator.

All honey and maple syrup should have vitamin C added to it as soon as it arrives from the supermarket. Warm it first; then stir in 1/4 tsp. per pint.

Fresh Tomato Juice

Simmer for 1/2 hour: 12 medium-sized raw, ripe tomatoes, 1/2 cup water, 1 slice onion, 2 ribs celery with leaves, 1/2 bay leaf, 3 sprigs parsley. Strain these ingredients. Season with: 1 tsp. salt (aluminum-free), 1/4 tsp. paprika, 1/2 tsp. honey. Serve thoroughly chilled. Makes about 4 servings.

Fresh Pineapple Juice

Peel a pineapple. Remove all soft spots. Cut it into cubes. Extract the juice by putting the pineapple through a food grinder or a blender. There will be very little pulp. Strain the juice and serve it on ice with sprigs of mint. Makes about 1 1/2 cups of juice. Mix the pulp with an equal amount of clover honey and use as a topping (kept in freezer) for homemade ice cream (below), pancakes, or yogurt.

Maple Milk Shake

For each milk shake, blend or shake together: 1 glass of milk and 2 tablespoons maple syrup.

Remember, all milk gets boiled.

Yankee Drink

Mix together 1 gal. water, 3 cups honey, 1/2 cup fresh lemon juice or distilled white vinegar, and 1 tsp. ginger.

Hot Vanilla Milk

Add one inch of vanilla bean and one tsp. honey to a glass of milk and bring to a near boil. You may add a pinch of cinnamon or other pure spice. You may even use vanilla extract.

Red Milk

Equal parts fresh carrot juice (use a juicer) and sterilized milk. Save the carrot pulp for salads and soups.

C-Milk

Milk can absorb a surprising amount of vitamin C powder without curdling or changing its flavor. Try 1/2 tsp. in
a glass of cold milk.

My Own Soda Pop

Excellent for stomach distress. Put 1 tsp. citric acid , 2 tbs. honey, and 1 lemon, juiced by hand, into a quart jar and fill with cold water. Refrigerate until ready to use. Then add 1 tsp. baking soda (chemically pure only) and shake a few times, keeping the lid tight. Pour over a few ice cubes. Many variations are possible: other fruit concentrates, made in the blender, can be used along with some lemon juice; for example, 2 blended whole apples (peeled), blended pineapple, orange or grapefruit. Always add a bit of lemon to give it zip. You may add a pinch of ginger or other pure spice.

Note: The amount of sodium in 1/2 tsp. baking soda is .476 grams. If you have heart disease, high blood pressure, or edema, use potassium bicarbonate instead. Ask your doctor what an acceptable amount of sodium or potassium bicarbonate is. I would suggest limiting yourself to one glass of soda pop a day, even if you do not have heart disease.

Another Note: the citric acid kills bacteria, while the carbonation brings relief.

My Own Super C-Pop

An excellent way to get lots of vitamin C into a child and relieve stomach distress at the same time. Squeeze 1 slice of lemon and 1 whole orange into an 8 ounce bottle that has a tight lid. Add 1 tsp. vitamin
C powder
(ascorbic acid), 1/4 tsp. citric acid, and 2 tbs. vegetable glycerin (you may also experiment with honey for sweetness). Fill the bottle to the top with cold water. Then add 1/2 tsp. chemically pure baking soda and close tightly. Shake briefly and serve immediately.

Half And Half

Mix equal parts whipping cream and milk or water. Boil and chill.

Buttermilk-C

Stir 1 tsp. vitamin C powder into a glass of milk. Add a pinch of potassium chloride. Additional seasoning may be pepper and herbs. Stir and enjoy.”

Food Recipes

“Daily Foods

Dairy products should contain at least 2% fat to enable you to absorb the calcium in them.

All milk should be sterilized by boiling it for 10 seconds. If it makes mucous, you already have a chronic respiratory infection. Try to clear this up.

Change brands every time you shop to prevent the same pollutants from building up in your body.

If frying or cooking with fat, use only olive oil, butter or lard (the BHT and BHA preservatives in lard are ok except for seizure sufferers). Mix them for added flavor in your dishes. Never use margarine, Crisco TM, or other hydrogenated fats. Do not cook over flames or grill, even when electric.

Eat lots of fresh fruits and vegetables. Wash them off only with cold tap water, not commercial food “wash.” Scrub hard with a stiff bristled brush. Then cut away blemishes. Always peel potatoes, apples, and carrots. Modern dirt is full of chemicals and is toxic to you.

Be sure to drink plenty of plain water from your cold faucet throughout the day, especially if it is difficult for you to drink it with your meals. If you don’t like the taste of your own tap water, try to get it from a friend with newer plumbing. Use a polyethylene (opaque) water jug from a grocery store to transport it. Never drink water that has been run through a water softener or copper plumbing or has traveled through a long plastic hose. Don’t drink water that has stood in a container for a day. Dump it and sterilize the container. To further improve flavor and to dechlorinate attach a small faucet filter made of carbon only. Or buy a filter pitcher. Don’t drink water that has stood in the filter pitcher very long, either.

Because commercial cold cereals are very convenient, but have solvents, here are two replacements.

Two Granolas

7 cups rolled oats (old fashioned, not quick)
1 tsp. salt
1 cup wheat germ (fresh, not defatted)
1/2 cup honey
1/2 cup sunflower seeds, immaculate quality
1/2 cup milk (no need to sterilize, it is being baked)
1/2 cup melted butter
1 cup raisins, rinsed in vitamin C water

Mix dry ingredients together. Mix liquid ingredients and add gradually, while tossing until thoroughly mixed. Place in large un-greased pans and bake in slow (250F) oven. Stir occasionally, baking until brown and dry, usually 1-2 hours. Store in airtight container in freezer.

6 cups rolled oats
1/2 cup raw wheat germ
1 cup sesame seeds
1 cup sunflower seeds (raw, unsalted)
1 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 cup melted butter
1/2 cup honey
Preheat oven to 250F. Toss all ingredients in mixing bowl. Spread thinly on a baking sheet and bake 20-25 minutes. Stir often in order to brown evenly. When golden, remove and let cool. Makes 12 cups.

If you would like to add nuts to your granola recipes, rinse them in cold tap water first, to which vitamin C powder has been added (1/4 tsp. per pint). This removes aflatoxins.

Peanut Butter

Use fresh unsalted roasted peanuts – they will be white on the first day they arrive at the health food store from the distributor. (Ask when they will arrive.) Or shell fresh roasted peanuts yourself, throwing away all shriveled or darkened nuts. Grind adding salt and vitamin C (1/4 tsp. per pint) as you go. For spreadability, especially for children, grind an equal volume of cold butter along with the peanuts. This improves spreadability and digestability of the hard nut particles. This will probably be the most heavenly peanut butter your mouth has ever experienced.

Sweetening and Flavoring

Brown sugar. Although I am prejudiced against all sugar from a health standpoint, my testing revealed no benzene, propyl alcohol, wood alcohol. However it does contain sorghum mold and must be treated with vitamin C to detoxify it. Add 1/4 tsp. to a 1 pound package; knead until well mixed.

Maple Syrup. Add vitamin C to newly opened bottle, 1/4 tsp. to retard mold. Keep refrigerated and use promptly.

Flavoring. Use maple, vanilla (both natural and artificial), and any pure spice. They are free of molds and solvents.

Honeys. Get at least 4 flavors for variety: linden blossom, orange blossom, plain clover and local or wild flower honey. Add vitamin C to newly opened jar to detoxify ergot mold (1/4 tsp. per pint).

Jams and jellies. They are not safe unless homemade.

Fruit syrup. Use one package of frozen fruit, such as cherries, blueberries or raspberries. Let thaw and measure the amount in cups (it might say on the package). Add an equal amount of clover honey to the fruit. Also add 1/4 tsp. vitamin C powder. Mix it all in a quart canning jar and store in the refrigerator. Use this on pancakes, cereal, plain yogurt and homemade ice cream too. Use to make your own flavored beverages in a seltzer maker or to make soda pop. If you wish to use fresh fruit, bring it to a boil to sterilize. Use it up in a few days or boil to sterilize it again.

Note for diabetics
Diabetics must not use artificial sweeteners. Nor can they use all the sweeteners listed. Try stevia powder instead.

Preserves

Keep 3 or 4 kinds on hand, such as peach, pineapple, and pear. Peel and chop the fruit. It should not have any bruises. If you use a metal knife, rinse the fruit lightly afterwards. Add just enough water to keep the fruit from sticking as it is cooked (usually a few tablespoons). Then add an equal amount of honey, or to taste and heat again to boiling. Put in sterile jars in refrigerator. Make marmalade the same way, slicing the fruit and peel thinly. Always add vitamin C powder to a partly used jar to inhibit mold. Never use up partly molded fruit by making preserves out of it. Throw it out.

C Dressing

1/2 cup olive oil
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice or white distilled vinegar
1 tsp. thyme, fenugreek or both (capsules are freshest)
1 tsp. vitamin C powder
1/2 tsp. brown sugar

Combine the ingredients in a clean salad dressing bottle. Shake. Refrigerate. The basic recipe is the oil and vinegar in a 2:1 ratio. After mixing these, add any pure spice desired. Or add fresh tomato chunks for creaminess.

Cheese Sauce

Add milk to cheese in equal amounts. Gradually heat to boiling while stirring. Add more of either to obtain the desired consistency. Boil 10 seconds. Use immediately.

Sour Cream-C

2 cups heavy whipping cream, previously boiled
1/4 tsp. citric acid
1/4 tsp. vitamin C powder
1 tsp. fresh onion juice or other seasoning (optional)

Stir until smooth, refrigerate 2 hours.

Yogurt

Buy a yogurt maker. Be sure and use boiled milk.

Soups

All homemade soups are nutritious and safe, provided you use no processed ingredients (like bouillon), or make them in metal pots. Use herbs and aluminum-free salt to season. Always add a dash of vitamin C or tomato juice or vinegar to draw out calcium from soup bones for you to absorb.

Fish and Seafood Recipe

Any kind of fish or seafood is acceptable, provided it is well-cooked. Don’t buy food that is already in batter. The simplest way to cook fish is to poach it in milk. It can be taken straight from the freezer, rinsed, and placed in 1/4 inch of milk (unboiled is fine) in the frying pan. Heat until it is cooked. Turn over and repeat. Throw away the milk. Serve with fresh lemon and herbs.

Baked Apples

Peel and core carefully. Remove all bruises (this is where the patulin is). Cut in bite-sized pieces, add a minimum of water and cook or bake minimally. Add a squirt of lemon juice when done. Serve with cinnamon, whipping cream and honey.

Ice creams from the grocery store are loaded with benzene and other solvents. Fortunately there are ice cream makers that do everything (no cranking)! Or try our recipe which uses a blender. Be sure not to add store bought flavors, except vanilla or maple.

5 Minute Ice Cream

(Strawberry) Use 2 half pints of whipping cream, previously boiled, 1 package of frozen strawberries (about 10 oz.), and 1/2 cup clover honey. Pour frozen strawberries into blender. Pour whipping cream and honey over them. Blend briefly (about 10 seconds), not long enough to make butter! Pour it all into a large plastic bowl. Cover with a close fitting plastic bag and place in freezer. Prepare it a day ahead. Try using other frozen fruits, such as blueberries and cherries. Keep a few berries out of the blender and stir them in quickly with a non-metal spoon before setting the bowl in the freezer. There are many ice cream recipes to be found in old cook books. Avoid those with raw eggs or processed foods as ingredients. You may add nuts if you rinse them with vitamin C water.

Cookies, cakes and pies

Bake them from scratch, using unprocessed ingredients. Use simple recipes from old cook books.

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