Chlorine-Free Baby Diapers

Chlorine Free Diapers

Long before our baby was born, the subject of diapers has plagued my husband and me. Our midwife suggested using cloth diapers. Cotton is breathable and comfortable against babies’ sensitive skin. Reusable diapers are environmentally responsible.

The problem with cloth diapers lies in the cleaning process. The right way to do it would be to flush solids and handwash all diapers in the sink using castile or olive oil soap. Personally, I find it a very time consuming process for a work-at-home mom. Throwing soiled, even rinsed, diapers in the washing machine does not sound sanitary either. Laundry bleach is out of the question, considering all the reports we have read about the health hazards of this common household chemical.

Our midwife suggested a diaper cleaning service that would pick up soiled diapers, and deliver clean ones. My husband and I discussed this option and found it unacceptable to have our child’s diapers mixed in with other babies’ diapers. To promote sanitation, diaper services use bleach when washing large amounts of diapers. Again, laundry bleach is a health hazard, and a menace to the environment.

What my husband and I finally decided on were disposable diapers that claim to be chlorine-free. I tried four different brands:

Seventh Generation is my favorite yet. This diaper is a light brown color, uses chlorine-free materials to absorb wetness and keeps my baby’s bottom dry through the night. Whenever I change her, I am really pleased with how dry her bum is, almost as if she had a layer of baby powder on her. Sometimes when the diaper is very full, I see some gel-like particles on her skin, but this happens very infrequently.

Tender Care claims to be chlorine-free although the diaper itself is white. Perhaps they whiten their product with non-chlorine alternatives. The sticker is too sticky and removing it tears the whole plastic top apart. Definitely not for overnight use, this diaper needs to be changed diligently every two hours maximum.

Tushies is another favorite. I like alternating this diaper with the Seventh Generation brand so that my baby’s bum doesn’t get chafed by the same shape of diaper all the time. This brand claims to be gel-free, no absorbent polymer which the Seventh Generation brand has. Tushies uses wood pulp whitened with chlorine-free hydrogen peroxide.

I had ordered the four brands above from Amazon, but lucky for me, the brands I wound up liking best are available at my local health food store.

5 Responses

  1. Thank you for an informative website. I felt that I must write to you as I completely disagree with your review of Tender Care diapers. My little boy has used them for almost a year and I could not be happier. I do not need to change his diaper at night (he sleeps from about 9p to 7-8a), and the diapers have never leaked during the night time. I would also say that it does not need to be changed every two hours, but of course this depends of personal preferences also. His skin is in good condition, he has never had diaper rash while using Tender Care.

    When I started buying this brand, I contacted the customer care line since I wanted to be sure that the diapers are all natural and I was assured that the diapers are not bleached with chlorine. Perhaps it’s done with hydroxen peroxide, I don’t know. I’m also happy with the sticker and have not had problems with them apart from those two or three times when I glued it accidently in the fabric part (after which the sticker does not stick as well).

  2. I have a 8 weeks old girl and we normally use cloth diapers. For backups and conveniences when we go out, I recently bought some Tender Care diapers. I do find that the tape is too sticky and it tears the pastic top apart if I am not too careful enough to cover the fabric portion. Other than that I find them ok but not great.

  3. DEAR MODERN WIFE

    WE CREATED PATENTED GEL-FREE TUSHIES DIAPERS FOR BABIES WITH SENSITIVE SKIN AND FOR MOMS & DADS WHO DO NOT WANT A SUPERABSORBENT NEAR THEIR BABIES SKIN. UNIQUE TUSHIES CAN NOT BE COMPARED TO ANY OTHER DISPOSABLE DIAPER. TUSHIES IS THE ONLY DISPOSABLE DIAPER IN THE WORLD THAT DOES NOT CONTAIN A SUPERABSORBENT. TUSHIES IS THE ONLY DIAPER IN THE WORLD THAT USES COTTON IN ITS ABSORBENCY. WE BLEND OUR COTTON WITH CHLORINE FREE NON-CHLORINE BLEACHED WOODPULP. TUSHIES IS THE ALTERNATIVE DIAPER BETWEEN CLOTH DIAPERS AND SUPERABSORBENT DIAPERS

    TENDERCAREDIAPERS.COM STORY-WHITE TENDERCAREDIAPERS PLUS ARE THE ONLY CHLORINE FREE NON-CHLORINE BLEACHED DISPOSABLE DIAPERS. IF YOU LOOK AT SEVENTH GENERATION’S ‘CHLORINE FREE DIAPERS’ BAG IN VERY SMALL PRINT ON THE BOTTOM YOU’LL SEE THAT THEY THEMSELVES STATE CERTAIN MATERIAL IN THEIR DIAPER IS NOT CHLORINE FREE. RE SEVENTH GENERATION AS A BROWN DIAPER THE OUTER COVER IS DYED BROWN. OTHER BROWN MATERIAL IN THE DIAPER HAD TO BE CHEMICALLY PROCESSED TO BECOME BROWN.

    TUSHIES & TENDERCARE DIAPERS PLUS CONTAINS SUSTAINABLE CERTIFIED NON-CHLORINE BLEACHED WOODPULP.

    $1.55 EARTH’S BEST ORGANIC BABY FOOD COUPONS ARE ATTACHED TO EACH TUSHIES & TENDERCARE DIAPERS BAG.

    THANK YOU FOR YOUR INFORMATIVE WEBSITE-AND FOR BEING A TUSHIES & TENDERCARE MOM.”

    SINCERELY,

    EDWARD REISS
    CEO, FATHER & GRANDFATHER
    TENDERCARE INT INC

  4. I have been using Seventh Generation diapers and love them. Unfortunately, I have recently found out that Seventh Generation is a supporter of PETA! So, we will no longer be using Seventh Generation products.

    Although I am all for human treatment of animals, I feel PETA is an extremist organization and anyone who aligns themselves with PETA will not get my $$$$.

  5. Seventh Gen diapers are dyed brown. I use Earth’s best because they are chlorine, latex, and dye free. The SAP gel never gets out and ends up on my baby. I’m surprised you recommend Seventh Gen as the best, considering this has happened more than once. Even once would be a deal breaker for me.

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